School of
Integrative Biology

SIB News

At the intersection of plankton and numbers

Graduate students in biology and mathematics collaborate to shed light on disease dynamics

Excessive rainfall as damaging to corn yield as extreme heat, drought

University of Illinois scientists have linked historical crop insurance, climate, soil and corn yield data to quantify the effects of excessive rainfall on corn yield.

Taking bird research to new heights

Mark Hauber broadens our understanding of the avian world

Stephen Long Elected to National Academy of Sciences

University of Illinois plant biology and crop sciences professor Stephen P. Long is one of 100 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Team measures puncture performance of viper fangs

Like other vipers, puff adder skulls have hinged jaws that deploy the fangs when the animal opens its mouth to strike.

Introducing Beescape: a new online tool and community to support bees

A new online tool and community, called Beescape, enables beekeepers, or anyone interested in bees, to understand the specific stressors to which the bees in their managed hives, home gardens or farms are exposed, according to researchers at the University of Illinois, through a collaboration with Penn State University.

Daniel Raudabaugh awarded Schmidt Science Fellowship

Daniel Raudabaugh, Plant Biology grad student in Andrew Miller's lab received a highly prestigious Schmidt Science Fellowship - after passing through several rounds of interviews.

Crops in silico 2.0: Project Extended with $5 million grant

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Crops in silico (Cis) project has received a $5 million grant from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to continue building a computational platform that integrates multiple models to study a whole plant virtually.

Researchers: Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity

Study explores little-understood effects of soil exposure on subterranean colonies. Results from a new study suggest that bees might be exposed to pesticides in more ways than we thought, and it could impact their development significantly.