SIB News

Rmalhi

Study reveals 10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North America

Anthropology professor Ripan Malhi works with Native Americans and First Nations groups to analyze their DNA and that of their ancestors.

Publication Date: 07 April 2017


Nhb sib slider

Invest in the School of Integrative Biology through the Natural History Building

Join us in building the future.

Publication Date: 31 March 2017


Hansen

Team nebulizes aphids to knock down gene expression

The soybean aphid is tiny, about the size of a pollen grain, but an infestation can cause soybean losses of up to 40 percent, studies reveal.

Publication Date: 31 March 2017


Photo2017

2017 World of Biology Photo Competition

Deadline for submissions: Thursday, March 31, 2017 at 5 pm
Exhibit of Entries: 2-4 PM, April 13, 2017
284 Morrill Hall

Publication Date: 14 February 2017


Rhizobia nodules on vigna unguiculata

Are We Making Selfish Microbes?

published by Terra Alpaugh on Thu, 2016-12-15 15:35

Publication Date: 19 December 2016


Ripan malhi

For First Nations peoples, effects of European contact are recorded in the genome

A study of the genomes of 25 individuals who lived 1,000 to 6,000 years ago on the north coast of present-day British Columbia, and 25 of their descendants who still live in the region today, opens a new window on the catastrophic consequences of European colonization for indigenous peoples in that part of the world.

Publication Date: 19 November 2016


Stephen long

Scientists tweak photosynthesis to boost crop yield

As computer models predicted, genetically modified plants are better able to make use of the limited sunlight available when their leaves go into the shade, researchers report.

Publication Date: 19 November 2016


Lisa ainsworth

Eight Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

Plant biology professors Lisa Ainsworth, Stephen P. Long, and Donald Ort are three of eight Illinois faculty members on the Clarivate Analytics / Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers list, 2016.

Publication Date: 19 November 2016


20160628 094541

Soybean plants with fewer leaves yield more

Using computer model simulations, scientists have predicted that modern soybean crops produce more leaves than they need to the detriment of yield—a problem made worse by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. They tested their prediction by removing about one third of the emerging leaves on soybeans and found an 8% increase in seed yield in replicated trials. They attribute this boost in yield to increased photosynthesis, decreased respiration, and diversion of resources that would have been invested in more leaves than seeds.

Publication Date: 19 November 2016


Absrf2016

Fellowship program provides opportunity for hands-on research experience

IB students receive Access and Achievement Program research fellowships in Animal Biology.

Publication Date: 01 November 2016