School of
Integrative Biology

SIB News

Scientists study puncture performance of cactus spines

The spines of Cylindropuntia fulgida, also known as jumping cholla, have a reproductive role. They latch on to passersby and carry small chunks of cactus flesh to new locations.

Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops

New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar, which targets some of the same nut and fruit orchards afflicted by the fungus. Scientists report in the Journal of Chemical Ecology that the two pests work in concert to overcome plant defenses and resist pesticides.

Berenbaum named PNAS editor-in-chief

Entomology professor and department head May Berenbaum has been appointed editor-in-chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Study finds potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa

A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with zebras, giraffes, elephants and other wild mammals – to the benefit of all.

Prof. Mark Hauber receives grant for international collaboration on invasive birds

Professor Mark Hauber receives a $270,000 grant to collaborate with Tel Aviv University researchers on how invasive birds succeed in new habitats.

Honey bee researcher Gene Robinson elected to National Academy of Medicine

Illinois entomology professor Gene Robinson was elected to the National Academy of Medicine “for pioneering contributions to understanding the roles of genes in social behavior.”

Eating insects could help fight world hunger

Insects could be a game changer in the race to combat food insecurity and achieve zero hunger.

Eating insects can help fight hunger and food insecurity. They are a fantastic source of nutrients—like protein—and food at times when the production of commonly eaten staple African food crops, like maize, fails due to the changing climate, droughts, or insect pest damage.

Playing a parasite for science

Postdoctoral researcher Mikus Abolins-Abols peers into the nest of an American robin.

In darters, male competition drives evolution of flashy fins and bodies

A new study of orangethroat darters reveals that the males’ ability to recognize their own and other species drives the evolution of their bright display colors.

Pointy eggs more likely to stay put in birds’ cliffside nests

Pointiness pays off for the eggs of cliff-dwelling birds, a new study reveals.