Department of
Entomology

Department of Entomology - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Doctoral Candidate Scott Clem Awarded Predoctoral Fellowship

Congratulations to Scott Clem, doctoral candidate in Dr. Alex Harmon-Threatt's lab, for being awarded the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Education and Workforce Development (EWD) Predoctoral Fellowship for $119,990 (award no. 2019-67011-29504). This is a two-year fellowship coupled with funding to continue his research on hover fly (Diptera: Syrphidae) migration and other winter survival strategies.

Honey Bees Remember Happy and Sad Times, Scientists Discover

While the brains of honey bees are tiny compared to those of humans, the insects are capable of some surprisingly advanced thinking.

Hollow peg holds key to click beetles’ explosive flips

Struggling to right themselves when stranded on their backs, click beetles have a remarkable correction strategy. Arching the joint between the front and second section of the thorax, the beetles suddenly release the deformation and spring spontaneously into the air. Entomologist Marianne Alleyne collaborated with Aimy Wissa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, and others to examine the structure holding the latch structure together.

The best way to help cows and zebras? Make them live together

In Kenya, cattle reduce tick populations and help protect wildlife

Brian Allan named University Scholar for Urbana-Champaign campus

Five University of Illinois professors at the Urbana-Champaign campus have been named University Scholars in recognition of their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. They will be honored at a Sept. 12 ceremony at the I Hotel and Conference Center, 1900 S. First St., Champaign.

Researchers turn to bees to guide better decision-making

Making important commercial or financial decisions can be a very difficult task, especially with a variety of perspectives and stakeholders to consider. Dr. Marianne Alleyne, assistant professor in entomology, and Molly Sturgis, graduate student researcher in industrial and enterprise systems engineering, have turned to bees to see what kinds of insights could be translated to human decision-making.

Featured Photo

A Jerusalem cricket seen above ground in Nevada.
Stenopelmatus sp. (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae)
Photo: Steve Taylor